My teaching material for an undergraduate course in statistics using JASP available at OSF

I have used the OSF platform to publish my teaching material (in Spanish) for the undergraduate course in statistics I gave this year at the Loyola University. The material was based on the book “Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences” by Susan A. Nolan and Thomas E. Heinzen (second edition) and was largely inspired by available material from Erin Michelle Buchanan, Tabetha Gaile Hopke, and Simone Donaldson.

How to upload your scientific software code to GitHub and get a DOI from Zenodo

This past weekend I had the pleasant experience of migrating my software KARDIA form its old home at the SourceForge repository to GitHub. Although the clearest benefit from this migration is the possibility to easier collaborate with other programers for the future development of the software, there are several other sweet candies that came along…

HEPLAB: Matlab scripts to facilitate heartbeat-evoked potential analysis

Last month my colleague Luis Ciria and I, gave a two-day workshop that focused on how to use the Matlab toolbox eeglab to create heartbeat-evoked events, extract epochs from the continuous EEG signal based on these events, and use Fieldtrip to perform a cluster-based permutation analysis to detect statistical differences between groups and conditions. The custom scripts we used at the workshop are freely available through the Zenodo repository.

Which side are you on boys?

As promised, I publish here a recent correspondence between Angel Correa, a colleague at the Brain, Mind & Behaviour Research Center of the University of Granada, and the editor of an Elsevier journal. I do not wish to express my opinion here —although the title and image of this post may be giving a hint— nor to reveal the identity of the editor. I prefer to listen to what my fellow colleagues think about which are the obligations and responsibilities of authors and journal editors in the emerging landscape of open scholarly communication.